Members

Behind the Fin with Cooper Hyland

Cooper loves helping others catch fish!

Cooper loves helping others catch fish!

Join us Behind the Fin with 13-year-old Cooper Hyland, JR Fishing Guide and TU Member.

How long have you been a TU member?

I have been a Trout Unlimited member for about 2 years now.


Why did you become a member and what chapter are you involved with?

I became a TU member because I met the manager of our local chapter, Greg Hardy, when I was fishing and he said it was a good way to help our fish so that they could be big and strong for all fisherman.


What is your favorite activity or project you have done with TU?

My favorite project that I have done with TU is the group fly tying session it was very cool to have so many people to learn from and so many secret flies.


Do you have a favorite place to fish or fun fishing story?

My favorite fishing story is when I was teaching a kid to fish and he was getting very discouraged because he could not get any fish and the last 5 minutes we were trolling with a Rapala and a huge brown trout ate it. When we got the monster on he was on a heavy rod and he almost broke it. As we got it into the boat the fish was in the net and before we get it into the boat he spun his head and snapped the hook and got away.  We had no picture of the fish. I felt so bad that we did not catch the fish, But a couple months later the mom of the kid called me to thank me for introducing him to the sport she says that he has become a self-made fisherman and is now fishing at least 1 time per week.

What does being a part of TU mean to you?

Being a TU member means a lot, but to me but I think that what it means to me the most is that I can sleep knowing that we are keeping our waterways safe and clean for future fisherman. 


What other hobbies or activities do you like to do? 

Some of my other hobbies include rocketry, engineering, electronics, and math.

Read the Latest Currents Newsletter

In an important victory for Colorado's rivers, communities and taxpayers, voters last night decided that Amendment 74 was NOT for them. We all value private property rights, and governmental “taking” of property already requires compensation under our Constitution. Amendment 74 would have gone far further, jeopardizing important state and local government efforts from water quality protections to even basic land use planning and zoning. Our pocketbooks were also at risk - a similar measure in Oregon led to more than $4 billion in claims against taxpayers. Fortunately 54% of Colorado voters rejected Amendment 74, leaving it far short of the 55% approval it needed to pass.

Local voters also approved new or renewed investment in natural resources such as parks, open space and water in Denver, Chaffee, Eagle and Park counties - good news for our conservation mission in those communities. Of course, Coloradoans also elected our next governor, Jared Polis, and a slate of new legislators. Colorado TU looks forward to working with Governor-elect Polis and with new and returning legislators from both parties on efforts to benefit our fisheries and watersheds, as well as our state's multi-billion outdoor industry.

Thank you to everyone who came out to vote against Amendment 74!

Other Highlights in the latest Currents Newsletter:

  • Colorado Gives Day

  • Frostbite Fish-off

  • Maroon Bells is Protected

  • Angler’s Guide to Rocky Mountain National Park

  • Winter Fishing the Cache La Poudre

  • Behind the Fin with Mike Goldblatt

  • Animas/Hermosa Creek Health post 416 Fire Event

  • Win a guided fly fishing trip for 2

  • Bonus Video: Backcountry Gunnison Fall Fly Fishing

Behind the Fin with Mike Goldblatt

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Join us Behind the fin with Mike Goldblatt, Programs Director and Board Member At Large of the Evergreen Chapter Trout Unlimited


How long have you been a TU Member?

I have been a member of ETU since 1985

Why did you become a member and what chapter are you involved with?    

I became a member to give back to the resource that I get to enjoy... Colorado's fisheries.

What is your favorite activity or project you have done with TU?

My favorite project currently is teaching an introduction to fly fishing class at Evergreen High School. Also, I am involved in the Greenback Cutthroat Recovery program in our local watershed.

Mike pointing at a temperature logger for a native Greenback Cutthroat Trout project.

Mike pointing at a temperature logger for a native Greenback Cutthroat Trout project.


I know you won’t tell me your favorite spot, but what is your second favorite place to fish or favorite fishing story? 

My favorite Colorado rivers are the Fryingpan, the Lake Fork of the Gunnison and the Conejos (pictured below).

The Conejos River. The picture was taken at the point where the river passes under US 285 in Conejos County, Colorado, a few miles north of Antonito. This file is licensed under the  Creative Commons   Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

The Conejos River. The picture was taken at the point where the river passes under US 285 in Conejos County, Colorado, a few miles north of Antonito. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

What does being a part of TU mean to you? 

Being a member of TU gives me the satisfaction of giving back to the resource and helping younger people become aware of coldwater fisheries conservation and enhancement.

What else do you do in your spare time or work?

I am a retired arborist. I enjoy fishing, golf, guitar, volunteering, and spending time with my grandkids.


Join Evergreen Trout Unlimited at their next monthly meeting on Wednesday November 14, 2018 7-9pm at Beau Jo’s Pizza. The presentation this month will be by Richard Pilatzke on Fly Fishing Terrestrials in the Rockies. Learn More.

First Fish on First Fly

Fishing up at Lake San Isabel for the second time that day! I was hooked on catching another one and went back that evening. 

Fishing up at Lake San Isabel for the second time that day! I was hooked on catching another one and went back that evening. 

I finally did it. I caught my first fish (actually 3 in total) on a fly rod. That's right! I officially made my right of passage into the Trout Unlimited family. I think my dad is regretting showing my sister and I how to fly fish - seeing as how we end up being the only ones catching anything. Sorry dad!

He is so small I couldn't believe he ate the fat flying ant that my sister tied. Of course we only got a picture of this smallest one ever, but he was the first!

He is so small I couldn't believe he ate the fat flying ant that my sister tied. Of course we only got a picture of this smallest one ever, but he was the first!

Flashback to that weekend

I was trying to keep my expectations low as it had only been my second time actually going fly fishing. I think it helped that we went to a stocked mountain lake where I could wade in about waist deep. The first one I caught was a tiny rainbow trout that barely fit in my hands. The next two were also rainbows but much larger (9-10 inches) with much more fight. Let's just say they both flopped up and then immediately unhooked themselves to quickly swim away. Of course, the only one we could snap a picture of was the first one. I guess that's just how fishing works - no one will believe that I caught anything larger unless I have a picture to prove it. 

I have to say that I never thought I would enjoy it so much until I felt the tug on the end of my line and then immediately lifting straight up to see the wicked bend of the rod. I now get it. I got it so much that after we came back to my parent's that afternoon, I was all set to go back out again that evening. 

After proving that I could actually catch something on a fly rod, let's just say my dad saw it fitting to purchase me some more gear to get me better prepared. It's not the most expensive, but for a beginner, it gets the job done. Now that I have the flyfishing bug - where should I go next? 

Andrea (Annie) Smith is CTU's Communications and Membership Coordinator. 

 

 

 

Behind the Fin with Josh Anaya

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Join us "Behind the Fin" with Josh Anaya, Secretary, Frostbite Fishoff Chair, Communications, and Webmaster for the Southern Greenbacks Trout Unlimited Chapter

How long have you been a member?

I've been a member for almost two years. My first meeting was our chapter's election meeting, and we still had a couple of board positions open -- one of them being chairman of our annual fundraiser, the Frostbite Fish-Off. I thought it sounded fun and interesting, and I had some similar previous experience in cyberspace, and figured I'd try it out "in real life". By the end of the year, I also absorbed the positions of Secretary, and Communications/Web Guy.


Why did you become a member and what chapter are you involved with?

Curiosity, mostly. In January 2017, I joined both Trout Unlimited, and Fly Fishers International. A friend at one of my local fly shops suggested I check out TU, and see if it was something I'd be interested in. I was (and still am) pretty new to fly fishing, and it seemed like a great way to immerse myself in the community, and accelerate the learning process. Our chapter is the Southern Colorado Greenbacks, Chapter 509. We have members from Custer, Fremont, and Pueblo Counties. 

What made you want to become involved with TU?

Again, curiosity, but I also have some legitimate concerns over the future of the Stream Protection Rule under the current administration, and where the planet in general is headed environmentally. I thought I'd see what TU was all about, and see what I could contribute to the organization.


What is your favorite activity or project that you have done with TU?

I'd have to say it was the Frostbite Fish-Off -- our chapter's annual fundraiser. This year we had fifteen teams of two anglers each competing for some great prizes, with a party and raffle afterward. All in all, we had about seventy people involved. I've signed on to be the chairman of the event for at least another year, but I'm also working on getting a Trout in the Classroom project going at my son's middle school for the 2018-2019 school year. 

Our chapter also has a lot of cross-pollination with our local Fly Fishers International chapter (shout out to the Pueblo Tailwater Renegades!), and we've had river cleanups, and planted willows along the Arkansas River with Colorado Parks and Wildlife. The Renegades also host a Thursday evening "Bluegill Bash" at the ponds next to the Arkansas Tailwater, and that's been pretty fun, too.

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What is your favorite activity or project that you have done with TU?

I'd have to say it was the Frostbite Fish-Off -- our chapter's annual fundraiser. This year we had fifteen teams of two anglers each competing for some great prizes, with a party and raffle afterward. All in all, we had about seventy people involved. I've signed on to be the chairman of the event for at least another year, but I'm also working on getting a Trout in the Classroom project going at my son's middle school for the 2018-2019 school year. 

Our chapter also has a lot of cross-pollination with our local Fly Fishers International chapter (shout out to the Pueblo Tailwater Renegades!), and we've had river cleanups, and planted willows along the Arkansas River with Colorado Parks and Wildlife. The Renegades also host a Thursday evening "Bluegill Bash" at the ponds next to the Arkansas Tailwater, and that's been pretty fun, too.
 

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I know you won’t tell me your top spot, so what is your second favorite fishing spot or favorite fishing story?

My second favorite fishing spot would be pretty much anywhere in the World of Warcraft. I've been playing on and off for about twelve years now -- mostly to keep in touch with friends (big /cheer to my friends in the Bloodbath & Beyond guild). I haven't had the time to do all the cool end-game stuff for quite a few years, but every once in a while I'll log in, play for a night or two, and sneak in some fishing. That's actually where I got my start fishing -- I've always been a video gamer, and have played online games for about 20 years, and many of the bigger online games have fishing systems built into them. Two years ago, though, I had fished all there was to fish in Warcraft, and I was looking at about four months before the newest version would be out. I'd always see people fishing along the Arkansas whenever I'd ride that route, and one day I thought, "A lot of my gamer buddies like fishing in real life. I'mma learn2fish." I found a class at one of my local fly shops that was actually happening that weekend, and I jumped right in. 


What does being a part of TU mean to you?

After only a year or so, I'm still defining what I want that to be. I'll help with TU's mission where I can, and when I can. I'd like to be more active at the State level, but I'm still figuring out what kind of impact I can have at the local level, especially with working with local businesses and government entities.


Beyond being an awesome angler, what else do you do in your spare time or for work?

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I wouldn't exactly call myself an awesome angler...yet. Professionally, though, I'm a software developer, but I have a lot of other things going on the side. My evenings are usually spent playing games with my kids, or helping them with their homework. Once everybody's asleep, I'm usually working on some art project or another, whether it's digital like 3d modeling, or something more traditional like painting and sculpting. I picked up fish carving after this year's Western Rendezvous after I stumbled across Bill Rottman's artwork in a shop, and then met him a month later at the Annual Woodcarving & Woodworking Show in Colorado Springs, hosted by the Pikes Peak Whittlers. I'm also working on a couple independent video game projects. 

I tie, too! The shop I learned to fly fish at -- The Drift Fly Shop in Pueblo -- has classes on tying, and I jumped into that, too. I love the art, and I was just awarded my bronze level award in fly tying from Fly Fishers International. Next on my project list are to complete the silver and gold levels of the award.

Joel Evans, CTU Board Member, featured in news report about saving the rainbow trout in Colorado

REPOST FROM KRTV.COM: 

Joel Evans has been fishing the same stretch of the Gunnison River in western Colorado for more than 40 years. Like most anglers in those parts, for him, one species of fish is king: the rainbow trout. 

Colorado wildlife officials working to save fish

But in the 1990s, that fight between fish and fisherman shifted to one between rainbow trout and a parasite that invaded Colorado rivers. It causes whirling disease, an aquatic plague where young fish are deformed, swim in circles and die of starvation. 
 
What does he like about them most? "There's a bit of fight involved," he said. since, Renzo DelPiccolo of Colorado Parks and Wildlife has been working to keep the rainbow trout alive through various breeding programs, but at great cost and with only limited success. He's seen a tenfold decrease in the fish's population. 
Ever

Behind the Fin with John Aaron

Picture taken January 2017.

Picture taken January 2017.

Join us "behind the fin" with John Aaron. John has been a local chapter president, Vice President of CCTU, Board member of two chapters, and a fund raiser for both local chapters and the State council as well as a behind the scenes advocate for trout and clean water for years.

How long have you been a TU member?

Since 1979.

What chapter are you involved with?

Originally, with Wild Trout chapter which became the Denver chapter, then with Cutthroat Chapter.

What made you want to be involved with TU?

Was looking for a group that was flyfishing oriented and might know where to catch them.

What is your favorite activity or project you have done with TU?

Too many to account for, but a couple that stand out, fighting the building of the proposed Two Folks dam, and the establishment of the South Platte restoration program with Todd Fehr, resulting in the restoration of miles in in town fisheries.

I know you won’t tell me your favorite spot, but what is your second favorite place to fish or favorite fishing story?   

Wind River in Wyoming and the Conejos River in Colorado. Did I mention Belize?

What does being a part of TU mean to you?

Enhancing the living places of fishes no matter the species.

What else do you do in your spare time or work?

Working on additional restoration efforts through non-TU projects, teaching new comers, Fly tying and attempting to raise the awareness of politicians to environmental concerns.

Meet the CTU Communications and Membership Coordinator

Canyonlands National Park, UT 2018

Canyonlands National Park, UT 2018

Hi there! My name is Andrea Smith, but you can call me Annie. I am so excited to be a part of the Colorado Trout Unlimited team as the new Communications and Membership Coordinator. I've been working here for about 4 months now and have met quite a few of your already at various events, board meetings, and most recently the 2018 Western Regional Rendezvous!  A little bit about me: I am originally from the Chicago area having lived there for 18 years until moving out to Colorado with my family. I attended the University of Colorado, Boulder and completed my Bachelor of Arts and Science in Environmental Studies with a minor in Geology. During my summers at college, I interned with multiple non-profits in the area. I once worked at the Greenwood Wildlife Rehabilitation Center with a focus on the care of injured or orphaned waterfowl and songbirds. I saw first hand the dangers that wildlife face in a human world and assisted the licensed rehabilitators in administering medical treatments.

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I also interned and later worked for the Inland Ocean Coalition (formerly the Colorado Ocean Coalition) a project of the Ocean Foundation, nonprofit. There I was the Lead in Operations and Public Outreach, but also wore many hats and became exposed to the inner workings of a non-profit which included development and growth through volunteer projects, trainings, programming, fundraisers, communications, outreach, and legislative activism. 

I've also been a Girl Scout my entire life and loved summer camp to the point that I also worked a summer up at Red Feather Lakes, CO (sadly closed now) as a Staff Counselor. 

Water has been a continuous theme in my life. I grew up near the Great Lakes and loved going swimming at the Illinois Beach State Park, camping in the Upper Peninsula in Michigan, and going on family road trips to some of the best outdoor places across the US. Some other hobbies I enjoy include: painting, hiking, photography, videography, kayaking, and playing my ukulele. 

Lake San Isabel

Lake San Isabel

I come from a family of fishermen and women, but I still haven't caught the fishing bug yet like my older sister has (she ties some great flies by the way). Whenever my dad goes fishing on Lake San Isabel, I'm the one in the kayak or hiking around the area collecting lost hooks or bobbers. I've had a lesson or two recently and am excited to find some great spots to practice my cast.  Feel free to send me your recommendations for a beginner angler like me!